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Nigerian Postgraduate Medical Journal

Awareness, perception and coverage of tetanus immunisation in women of child bearing age in an urban district of Lagos, Nigeria

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Last Updated on Wednesday, 16 July 2014 10:52

Awareness, perception and coverage of tetanus immunisation in women of child bearing age in an urban district of Lagos, Nigeria


Sule SS,  *Nkem-Uchendu C, Onajole AT, Ogunowo BE.
Department of Community Health and Primary Care, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, Lagos Nigeria.
*Clearline International HMO, 16A Oyefeso Avenue, Obanikoro, Lagos.


Correspondence to:
Salami Suberu Sule,
National Postgraduate Medical College of Nigeria,
Km 26 Lagos-Badagry Expressway, Ijanikin, Lagos.Nigeria e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Summary
Aims and Objectives: This study assessed the level of awareness and perception of women of child bearing age to tetanus immunisation and determines the cover- age rate in Ojodu Local Council Development Area (LCDA) of Lagos State, Nige- ria.
Subjects and Methods: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study of 288 women of childbearing age selected using multistage sampling technique. Information was obtained using structured close-ended questionnaire. Data analysis was done using Epi-InfoTM software, version 3.5.1.
Results: There was high level of awareness of tetanus immunisation among re- spondents (89%) and as a method of prevention of tetanus (76%). There was a positive association between the level of awareness and respondents' educa- tional level and occupation (p < 0.05). However, there is a low level of awareness regarding the number of doses of the vaccine required in pregnancy (14.4%) and for life protection (19.5%). Those who ever received the vaccine, got it post-injury (48.9%) and in pregnancy (45.2%). Age, occupation and parity were positively associated with receiving the vaccine (p < 0.05), while parity and marital status were positively associated with number of dose of vaccine received (p < 0.05). Only about 20% of the respondents had received two or more doses of the vaccine. Conclusion: This study concludes that despite the high level of awareness about tetanus and tetanus immunisation, there is a low coverage rate of tetanus immunisation among women of childbearing age in Ojodu LCDA of Lagos State. Women of child bearing age should also be targeted at the community level in tetanus immunisation campaign programme.

Keywords: awareness, coverage, tetanus immunization, women, neonates.

 

The effect of a sexuality education programme among out- of- school adolescents in Lagos, Nigeria.

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Odeyemi KA , Onajole AT , Ogunowo BE , Olufunlayo T, *Segun B

Department of Community health and Primary Care, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Nigeria.

* Evidence for action, Nigeria.

Correspondence to: Kofoworola A. Odeyemi Phone : +2348023171271 Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Summary Aims and Objectives: This study was conducted to assess the effect of a community based sexuality education programme on the sexual health knowledge and practices of out of school female adolescents. Subjects and methods: This Intervention study was conducted in two markets within Lagos, Nigeria. Representative samples of adolescents were interviewed on their sexual health knowledge and practices. An Education- entertainment programme provided sexuality education to adolescents in Mushin market only (intervention group) followed by post intervention surveys in Mushin market and Sangrouse market (control group). The pre and post intervention surveys were compared 6 months post intervention to detect any changes. Results: Sexual health knowledge and behaviour was similar among respondents in both markets pre intervention. Post intervention, the sexual health knowledge of the respondents in the intervention site improved significantly. (p<0.05) Fewer adolescents initiated sex in the intervention site than in the control site and contraceptive use increased. However among the sexually active, there was no significant change in their condom use and number of sexual partners. Conclusion: Community based health education programmes can be used to provide effective sexuality education for out of school adolescents. Provision should be made by government and non-governmental organisations during adolescent reproductive health programming for sexuality education targeted at out of school adolescents.

Keywords: adolescents, sexuality education, out of school

 

 

A cross-sectional study for algorithm in diagnosing simple uncomplicated malaria in children in health facilities without laboratory backup in Nigeria.

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Otokpa AO , *Asuzu MC

Department of Community Medicine, University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Gwagwalada, Abuja, Nigeria.

*Department of Community Health, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

Correspondence to: Otokpa AO e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it mPhone +2348059129998, +2347030399229

Summary

Aims and objectives: The objective of this study was to determine an algorithm for malaria diagnosis using presenting signs and symptoms of children (aged 0-13years) with uncomplicated malaria in Gwagwalada Area Council of Abuja, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A validated questionnaire was used to obtain relevant data from 400 children diagnosed presumptively of simple malaria by clinicians and 400 other children of similar sex and age considered as not having malaria. Giemsa-stained thick blood films were used to determine parasitaemia. Data obtained was analysed using Epi-Info version 3.3.2.

 

Results: Thirty-eight per cent of children with presumptive diagnosis of malaria had parasitaemia. Fever, rigor, vomiting, jaundice, pallor and spleen enlargement had significant statistical relationship with parasitaemia on bivariate analysis, but only fever (p=0.00), rigor (p=0.00), vomiting (p=0.00), and pallor (p=0.00) maintained the relationship when subjected to logistic regression analysis. But these symptoms individually had low sensitivity and/or specificity. Candidate algorithms (combinations of symptoms) were then successively subjected to bivariate, logistic and validity analyses. Fever with vomiting gave the highest sensitivity (56.2%), specificity (76.4%) and PPV (60.0%) and were therefore adopted as the algorithm of choice.

Conclusion and recommendations: Children presenting with fever and vomiting without any other obvious cause in health facilities without laboratory support in the research area should receive antimalarial treatment, to help reduce the malaria scourge. This algorithm should be field-tested and if found reliable should be adopted to ease the problem of malaria diagnosis in peripheral health facilities.

Keywords: malaria, algorithm, diagnosis, laboratory, parasitaemia, validity.

   

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