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Nigerian Postgraduate Medical Journal

Do Caregivers receive Health Information on their children’s illnesses from Healthcare Providers while hospitalised?

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Nwaneri, UD *Oviawe, OO Oviawe, O

Department of Child Health and *Accident & Emergency Unit University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria.

Correspondence to: Oviawe O. e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: +234-8037275398

Summary

Aims and Objectives: To assess caregivers knowledge of their childs illness following hospital admission and to determine whether healthcare workers (physicians and nurses) render health information during their daily routine works.

Patients and methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out from July to October 2012 in University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria among 108 caregiver and child (ages 0 5 years) pairs admitted in the paediatric wards of the hospital for common childhood illnesses. A semi-structured interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to obtain data from the caregivers. Each childs case note was then reviewed to extract data on childs disease diagnosis and to check and categorize whether the attending physician(s) documented the content of health information provided to the caregivers. Analysis of data was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 16.

Results: The children were 48 males and 60 females with mean age [SD] 19.6 [15.4] months. The caregivers mean age [SD] was 32.1[7.1] years (range 15 60 years). Majority (38.0%) of the caregivers had at least secondary or tertiary education. Two-thirds of the caregivers correctly mentioned names of diseases of their children; and 25/108(23.1%) received health information from the healthcare providers. Caregivers with primary or no formal education significantly did not know the correct names of the childs disease when compared with caregivers with either secondary or tertiary education (OR = 2.8, p = 0.03). There was no documentation of the content of health information rendered by the healthcare providers during their routine work.

Conclusions: Physicians should provide health information to all caregivers especially those with lower level of education. All cadres of health workers should be encouraged to give health information to health seekers utilising their facility.

Key words: health education, under-five, caregivers, hospitalised children

 

Preliminary report of HLA (DNA) typing of Nigerians using sequence-specific primer technique

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Bolarinwa RA, Oyekunle AA, *Arogundade FA, *Sanusi AA, Salawu L, Togun RA, Akinola NO, Durosinmi MA, *Akinsola AA.

Departments of Haematology and Immunology and *Medicine, Obafemi Awolowo University and Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

Correspondence to: Dr. RA Bolarinwa

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Summary

Aims and Objectives: This communication is an attempt to present the experience and a preliminary report of results over a one-year period.

Patients and Methods: From December 2011 to December 2012, a prospective determination of the HLA types of 20 individuals referred to the Tissue Typing Laboratory of the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex (OAUTHC), Ile-Ife was done. These consisted of prospective transplant recipients, their donors, and a migrant pair for kinship determination. DNA was extracted from the clients peripheral blood sample, using the QIAmp Blood DNA Mini kit, (Qiagen). PCR was done using Olerup® low-resolution PCR-SSP typing kit. The PCR product was resolved in 2% agarose gel, and the bands visualised under UV light. The HLA types were determined using provided tables and/or Helmberg software. Data were presented using descriptive statistics whileHLA antigen frequency (AF) was expressed in percentage and gene frequency (GF) was determined using square root method (1-(1-AF)1/2).

Results: A total of 20 individuals (13males and 7females) consisting of seven renal transplant recipients and seven prospective donors; a stem cell recipient and three donors and a migrant pair for kinship determination were typed. Age ranged from 4-65 years. 44 HLA alleles were detected, while HLA-A, B, C, DRB1 and DQB1 were 7, 10, 11, 8, 8 alleles respectively. The alleles were heterogeneous in distribution while 6 antigens (HLA-A*02, B*30, C*15, DRB1*03, DRB1*08 and DQB1*06) were having frequencies e”25%.

Conclusion: This report confirms that DNA-based HLA typing is feasible locally, andit was observed that renal transplantation procedure is the most frequent indication. The HLA antigens observed to have very high frequencies (e”25% frequency) in this population were HLA-A*02, B*30, C*15, DRB1*03, DRB1*08 and DQB1*06. There is a strong need to develop a broad-based HLA data bank for Nigeria to further strengthening her transplantation programmes.

Key Words: HLA typing, sequence specific primer, Nigeria.

 

Co-Morbidity of attention deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and epilepsy In children seen In University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital Enugu: Prevalence, Clinical and social correlates

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Ibekwe Roland Chidi1 Ndukuba Appolos Chidi2 Aronu Ann Ebele1 Ojinnaka Ngozi Chinyelu1 1 Neurology Unit, Department of Paediatrics Department of Psychological Medicine University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku-Ozalla, Enugu

Correspondence to: Roland C. Ibekwe Tel: +234-80-37875631

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Summary Aims and objectives: - To determine the prevalence of ADHD, epilepsy co-morbidity and social and clinical correlates in Nigerian children.

Patients and methods: - A cross-sectional study of 113 children with epilepsy was carried out and assessed for ADHD prevalence using the home version of the ADHD Rating Scale IV. The presence of certain variables occurring in association with the co-morbidity was also determined.

Results: - Sixteen (14.2%) children had ADHD, epilepsy co-morbidity. The inattentive subtype of ADHD was the most common (68.8%). The factors that were significantly associated with the co-morbidity were poor academic performance ( p=0.01), living in rural areas ( p=0.00), history of status epilepticus ( p=0.00) and the presence of other associated neurological pathologies ( p=0.00).

Conclusion: - Children with the co-morbidity are more likely to be those that are underachieving academically, with history of status epilepticus, family history of epilepsy, and abnormal EEG. Children with the co-morbidity should be actively sought after and managed accordingly.

Key words: attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, epilepsy, children.

   

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